PRESS RELEASE: Former Guantanamo Detainee, the Subject of a Major Motion Picture, Supports ex-Guantanamo Prosecutor Moe Davis in Congressional Campaign

***MEDIA ALERT***

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

FROM MOE DAVIS FOR CONGRESS CAMPAIGN

Contact: Viv Bernstein

               828-214-7876

                [email protected]

 

January 16, 2020

FORMER GUANTANAMO BAY DETAINEE —THE SUBJECT OF A MAJOR MOTION PICTURE CURRENTLY IN PRODUCTION – SUPPORTS EX-GUANTANAMO PROSECUTOR MOE DAVIS IN CONGRESSIONAL CAMPAIGN

Mohamedou Ould Slahi, who spent 14 years as a detainee at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba and is now the subject of a movie in production in South Africa called “Prisoner 760,” has offered his best wishes to Moe Davis in his congressional campaign in North Carolina. Slahi’s attorney, Nancy Hollander, also issued a statement in support of Davis, a former Air Force Colonel (Ret.) who was Chief Prosecutor of Terrorism Trials at Guantanamo Bay from September 2005-October 2007 and is now running for Congress in North Carolina’s 11th District.

Davis is best known as the prosecutor who resigned his post after refusing an order to use evidence obtained through torture in trials. He later wrote a letter of clemency on behalf of Slahi, who was released from Guantanamo prison in 2016.

Slahi recently wrote to Davis via direct message on Twitter to express his support for the campaign.

“Dear friend! I pray and hope that you make it. Your election as a congressman will surely serve the true American values. Good luck brother.”

Hollander, the attorney who gained Slahi’s release and is being portrayed by Jodie Foster in “Prisoner 760,” which also features Tahar Rahim, Shailene Woodley and Benedict Cumberbatch, credited the clemency letter written by Davis as being instrumental in freeing Slahi. Her statement of support for Davis reads, in part:

In my efforts to free Mr. Slahi, I found an unexpected ally. Colonel Morris “Moe” Davis, the former Chief Prosecutor at Guantanamo Bay, came forward to write a letter … in May, 2016 in support of Mr. Slahi. In the letter, Col. Morris wrote that there was no evidence to charge Mr. Slahi with a crime other than that obtained through torture ­ — which he deemed unreliable and unacceptable – and we needed to ask if we would condone continued detention if he were an American citizen.

Mr. Slahi was finally released on Oct. 17, 2016. I believe the letter from Col. Davis played an integral role in that release. Col. Davis had no obligation to write that letter. The fact that he did so I believe speaks to his character. That is the kind of character we need in Washington today.

Davis, 61, went on to lead the Air Force Judiciary before retiring from the military in 2008. He later served as Senior Specialist for National Security for the Congressional Research Service, law professor at Howard University and judge with the U.S. Department of Labor before returning to his home state of North Carolina in 2019 and announcing a run for Congress.

Davis and Slahi have remained in contact for years.

“I’m grateful,’’ Davis said of the support he received from Slahi and Hollander. “She came to me, not expecting an ally, and it was the right thing to do.

“We can’t give him back the years he spent sitting there behind the iron wire. But it looks like he’s making the most of the opportunity he got and I’m happy for him.”

More information on Davis can be found at MoeDavisForCongress.com.

 

Mountain Strong

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